depression glass

chrome cake dish

My mother’s visit in photos

juicer

Green depression glass juicer

When my mom arrived yesterday afternoon, she brought me a lovely green depression glass juicer she found in her attic.

We had sandwiches, then headed out for some antiquing. At our first stop, we evaluated some reference books on vintage jewelry. My mother has discovered a ton of jewelry in her attic, mostly Coro, and wants to know more about it. While she didn’t find a book that jumped out at her, I found one packed with photos of hats, handbags, compacts, belts, jewelery, sunglasses, and other accessories.

book

My buys: Vintage Fashion Accessories and three compacts.

I also bought three compacts: one by Volupte, another by Cara Nome, and one with no maker’s mark but interior construction and details exactly like my mystery compact. The mate to my mystery compact has wonderful artwork of a butterfly on the lid. My original intent was to keep the butterfly and resell the other two pieces, but the Cara Nome presents a collecting dilemma I’ll discuss later this week: I seem to have accumulated a set.

One of the clerks at the shop offered my mother some good information about replacing stones in vintage jewelry. The rhinestones available now have flat backs, while the stones used in vintage pieces are faceted. The color also varies. To match color and appearance accurately, my mom should sacrifice one old piece of jewelry that’s beyond repair and use those stones to replace missing ones in other pieces.

This shop also had a gorgeous plastic cherry necklace. Sadly, I don’t have an extra $235 lying around. Lovely, but not a purchase I can justify at this point in life. The next shop we visited was more crowded. I saw a lady head vase I liked, but my mother rolled her eyes at it and pointed out that I’d already bought a bunch of things, so that may be a purchase for another day.

head vase

Lady head vase

cherry necklace

Cherry necklace.

When we finished poking around there, we headed to the liquor store where we sampled some ginger liqueur. Delicious! I may buy some next time Tim and I have a special event or extra space in our liquor cabinet.

Then we headed back to my house and I frosted the chocolate cake I baked in honor of my mother’s birthday. To keep the cake safe from inquisitive cats, I put it in my vintage chrome cake dish–a present my mother bought me years ago.  

chrome cake dish

chrome cake dish.

Then Tim and I made dinner for my mom: baked stuffed scallops, green beans sauteed with diced ham, cashews, and a teeny bit of duck fat, and a baby greens salad with blood orange vinaigrette. Tim did a wonderful job of making sure everything was on track and ready to serve at the same time. My mom enjoyed dinner. Afterwards, we had a vicious three-man game of Scrabble. The secret to beating my mother? Keep refilling her wine glass. We finished up with coffee and cake, then went to bed.

percolator

GE electric percolator.

This morning: a reason to break out my percolator. Tim’s making my mother a loaf of bread while we fuel up to start the day’s adventures.
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Green with envy: Depression glass

Depression glass pitcher

Green depression glass pitcher used to hold wooden spoons.

Over the weekend, my amazing husband tore apart our kitchen and cleaned everything…including my favorite Depression glass pitcher. My fascination with Depression glass started when I was about 8 years old. One of my grandmothers had handed down some plain green glass dishes to my mother. We used them on the weekends for sandwiches. I loved the color and how the light came though them, not to mention being mature enough to be trusted with a REAL GLASS plate…not plastic like we used at my other grandmother’s house.

I didn’t learn what Depression glass was until much later, when the love for clear green glass ran deep in my blood. When I got my first apartment, my mother passed on the green glass plates I loved so much. I found this pitcher while antiquing one day and knew it belonged in my kitchen. That may have been three or four kitchens ago, but my love for pale green Depression glass has endured.

In our current kitchen, the pitcher sits by the stovetop–the perfect receptacle for wooden spoons and other implements of cooking construction.  (The spoon in the front actually belonged to my grandfather, I remember using it to make brownies together.) I love small touches like this as accents. We use empty clementine crates with retro labels to store snack foods–another detail that gives our kitchen a vintage feel.